Autonomous Vehicle Test & Development Symposium 2017
 
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2017 Conference Program

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Day 1

Tuesday 20 June

8.15am - 8.55am - Networking Breakfast

8.15am - Join us on the opening morning for our complimentary networking breakfast! All speakers, delegates, and sponsors are invited to attend

9am - 12.45pm - Opening Keynote Session

Moderator
Prof Frank Flemisch, branch head, Fraunhofer FKIE / RWTH Aachen, GERMANY

9am - Advancements in human factors for highly automated cars
Frederik Diederichs, Engineering Systeme / Human Factors Engineering & Vehicle Interaction, Fraunhofer IAO, GERMANY
The highest uncertainty for highly automated cars evolved from the human factors. How can automated cars be supervised and controlled by human beings? By now the uncertainty has settled down and left 'no go' as well as pragmatic 'does work' solutions. These will be presented as well as new trends for the automated driving experience.

9.30am - A human-centered design framework for future vehicles
Dr Cyriel Diels, senior lecturer Human Factors, Coventry University, UK
With the advance of shared and automated mobility, the driver will no longer be at the heart of the design process. Instead, all efforts will be directed toward the passenger experience which, in future, will become the key user requirement and commercial differentiator. However, designing the passenger experience for shared and automated vehicles is anything but trivial due to the new psychological and physical challenges it introduces. A human-centered design framework is provided to assist the development of safe, usable, comfortable and desirable future mobility solutions.

10am - Reviewing the state of semi-autonomous HMI
Derek Viita, Senior Analyst- User Experience Practice, Strategy Analytics, USA
Good UX and cockpit design in an autonomous driving ecosystem hinges on proper communication of system status, smooth handover and takeover procedures, and the natural feeling of driving maneuvers. Strategy Analytics regularly conducts evaluations of a variety of autonomous and semi-autonomous features, including park assist, traffic jam assist and autonomous highway driving. In this session, we review current semi-autonomous offerings, and potential effects on future rollout of fully autonomous driving systems.

10.30am - 11.15am - Break

11.15am - Intention – a tool to increase trust in automated vehicles
Maria Nilsson, senior researcher, Rise Viktoria, SWEDEN
With the increased level of automation, concerns have been raised regarding drivers becoming out of the control loop, causing reduced satisfaction and reduced perceived control. Our research has explored the role of 'intention communication' as an innovative way to leverage mutual understanding between human and automation. By using Wizard-of-Oz techniques, independent research has been made possible that shows the role of intention communication for perceived control and safety. Studies are presented that exemplify different approaches for intention communication using internal and external interfaces.

11.45am - How infotainment will influence autonomous cars’ cockpits and interiors
Hans Roth, director technology marketing, Harman Becker Automotive Systems GmbH, GERMANY
Passengers in autonomous vehicles will enjoy a whole new range of freedoms. They will be able to read, work, watch movies and – in the long term – even sleep. This will not only have a lasting impact on the character of travelling by car; it also calls for completely new interior and seating architectures, as well as operating and display concepts. Infotainment technology world leader Harman teamed up with Swiss automotive think-tank Rinspeed to develop the XchangE touring sedan and the ‘trans-urban SUV’ Budii, two autonomous driving concept cars that show what 21st-century mobility will look like.

12.15pm - How aircraft cabin design can influence configuration of autonomous vehicles
John Tighe, design director transport, JPA Design, UK
We will explore how innovation in the design and configuration of airline seats and cabins that perform many functions can help benefit and influence the design of interiors for the autonomous vehicle. JPA Designs for the world's leading airlines, developing spaces and seats that are multi-functional yet comfortable and intuitive for passengers. A space to relax, watch a movie, work, dine, sleep and socialise. How could this up-in-the-air experience influence the on-the-ground autonomous vehicle? What are the possibilities and what would this look like?

12.45pm - 2.15pm - Lunch

2.15pm - 6pm - HMI and UX considerations for AV interiors

Moderator
Frederik Diederichs, Engineering Systeme / Human Factors Engineering & Vehicle Interaction, Fraunhofer IAO, GERMANY

2.15pm - AdaptIVe – human factors aspects of automated driving
Stefan Wolter, HMI specialist, Ford Werke GmbH, GERMANY
A presentation of selected results from the AdaptIVe large-scale European project on vehicle automation, focusing on aspects of the human-vehicle integration subproject.

2.45pm - Designing interiors and human-machine interfaces for resilience of automated vehicle systems
Prof Frank Flemisch, branch head, Fraunhofer FKIE / RWTH Aachen, GERMANY
Yigiterkut Canpolat, research associate, Human Systems Integration RWTH Aachen University, GERMANY
Vehicle automation is one way of using autonomous capabilities together with humans. Partially automated systems are already in serial production, and highly and fully automated vehicles are under research and development. Resilience is the key ability to safely respond to non-normal events. This paper gives an introduction to the DFG System Ergonomics project, which deals with resilient design and test of automated vehicle systems in normal operations, at system limits and at failures. Some theory and the state of the research will be sketched, and examples given of how to practically apply this to design and testing for interior and human-machine interfaces of automated vehicles.

3.15pm - To drive or to be driven: human-centred vehicles of tomorrow
Dr Meike Jipp, head of Human Factors Department, Institute of Transportation Systems, German Aerospace Centre (DLR), GERMANY
In the near future, automated systems will ease the driving task and drive autonomously at least partially. Such systems have the potential to revolutionise mobility. Therefore, these systems have to be enabled to cope with individual user requirements and to interact adequately with drivers of less equipped vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians. The systems are thus part of a complex socio-technical system, which has to be optimised as a whole. This optimisation includes the adequate consideration of challenges from a human-factors perspective. These challenges, and solutions to these challenges, will be discussed within the scope of this presentation.

3.45pm - 4.30pm - Break

4.30pm - Highly automated driving – key components for driver-vehicle interaction
Dr Thomas Vöhringer-Kuhnt, head of Comptence Center HMI, Continental Automotive GmbH, GERMANY
Bettina Leuchtenberg, expert for usability & ergonomics, Continental Automotive GmbH, GERMANY
Dr Heinz Abel, head of Center of Competence, Continental Automotive GmbH, GERMANY
This presentation will discuss Continental Automotive' approach to HMI solutions for passenger vehicles, with a focus on automated driving.

5pm - Grow confidence from your driving simulator results
Philip van der Borch, application engineer, Moog, NETHERLANDS
Human behavior plays a key role in designing and validating new UX concepts. A robust and valid test environment is required to execute such tests. For many years, driving simulators have been used to provide a reproducible test environment. These driving simulators vary from simple desktop setups up to highly complex large hydraulic systems. What should a driving simulator consist of to obtain valid results? By means of real-life examples, this presentation illustrates what effect a driving simulator concept has on human behavior.

5.30pm - From assisted to autonomous driving: an HMI perspective
Olaf Preissner, head of UX automotive, Luxoft, GERMANY
Understand the HMI as the center of consumer experience of non-autonomous and autonomous driving. What is the effect on user experience during automated driving? Autonomous driving from an end-user/usability perspective. The presentation will discuss the paradigm shift in the driver-vehicle relationship with advanced automation – changing the driver’s role from 'driving' to 'supervising'. Understand the specific HMI development challenges of autonomous driving and the requirements for a future HMI.


Day 2

Wednesday 21 June

9am - 1.30pm - AV Interiors that enhance mode awareness and transition

Moderator
Derek Viita, Senior Analyst- User Experience Practice, Strategy Analytics, USA

9am - Are consumers ready and waiting for automated vehicles?
Fabian Chowanetz, senior consultant, automotive solutions, J.D. Power and Associates GmbH, GERMANY
Understanding users’ interaction satisfaction with ADAS technology in their vehicles today will play a critical role for future consumer interest in increasing levels of automation. Customers’ problems with technology define a framework for the development of tomorrow’s vehicle interior concepts. Within this session, Fabian will explore J.D. Power’s latest consumer research surrounding automotive usability regarding first-time ease of use and learning of new technologies. He will also reveal future and emerging technologies that consumers are seeking in their next vehicles and address the importance of trust in technology.

9.30am - Facilitating safe, user-paced control transitions in automated vehicles
Alexander Eriksson, Marie Curie ITN Fellow, University of Southampton, UK
The development of automated vehicles is quickly advancing in industry, and several challenges have to be tackled as part of this progression. There is a plethora of research addressing urgent transitions of vehicle control, but no one is talking of the more mundane, regular non-critical transition. Our research has found great variability in the time drivers take to resume control in non-critical situations, ranging from 2-25 seconds. The question is, what are the consequences of this, and how can we design and facilitate the transition process in non-critical transitions of control?

10am - Mode awareness issues in partially and highly automated driving
Dr Christian Purucker, project manager, WIVW GmbH, GERMANY
Recent events have raised public attention regarding mode awareness issues in partially and highly automated vehicles. Although there is a tradition of human factors research on mode awareness issues in the field of aviation, this research has only just begun within the field of vehicle automation. However, research from recent years has already accumulated considerable knowledge in this domain, and will continue to do so. The talk will discuss examples of mode awareness issues in this domain and review relevant works.

10.30am - Supporting non-driving-related activities in the autonomous car
Bastian Pfleging, researcher, Ludwig Maximilian Universität - Human-Machine Interaction Group, GERMANY
Today, many car drivers face the challenge of maneuvering a car and simultaneously operating in-car computer systems. The driver adjusts the climate control unit, selects a music title, enters navigation destinations, etc. However, such interaction distracts the driver from his primary task of driving the car. This presentation will present examples of research on novel user interfaces that support safe driving and a good user/driving experience in the transition between manual and automated driving.

11am - 11.30am - Break

11.30am - Driver monitoring as a building block for autonomous driving
Christian Mueller, senior manager innovation field advanced driver assistance, Leopold Kostal GmbH & Co KG, GERMANY
To meet the requirements for an autonomous or semi-automated ride, it is necessary to detect the driver's attention level. In AD-Level 2, driver observation can contribute to a significant comfort gain. Also a lower demand of the driver's attention (fatigue and micro sleep) must be detected, for example, by an analysis of the eyelids. In addition to the assistance and safety area, the driver monitoring camera will play an important role in the future vehicle HMI. The various levels of algorithms and also the necessary hardware technologies will be covered in this presentation.

12pm - How autonomous vehicle interiors can be designed to make users aware of urgent situations when operating in autonomous mode.
Johann Visser, senior consultant (traffic systems), Rijkswaterstaat, NETHERLANDS
How autonomous vehicle interiors can be designed to make users aware of urgent situations when operating in autonomous mode. Autonomous vehicles are going to support and eventually replace drivers as a factor within the traffic system. The traditional interface between road agencies (authorities, operators) and drivers is shifting toward vehicle interiors. This especially holds true for autonomous driving levels 3 and 4, even more so with mixed traffic. We will explore how urgent road agency directions may effectively be transmitted to drivers during hands-and-eyes-off mode, under what conditions vehicle interior changes will facilitate road-side divestments, and in which areas regulation and standardization are needed.

12.30pm - Camera-based smart and attentive interiors: recognising passengers and situations
Dr Michael Voit, research group manager, Fraunhofer IOSB, GERMANY
Recognising passengers and the interior activity situation can be crucial in determining whether the driver is distracted or able to take over control of a (semi-)autonomous car. Herein, not only is the driver's state key, but also the presence of further passengers within the car and with whom and how they are interacting. Furthermore, getting to know the driver and passengers provides many possibilities for personalised safety and even comfort functions, in order to increase the overall user experience and heighten the fun in driving.

1pm - Passenger behaviour tracking as a prerequisite for autonomous vehicles
Moritz von Grotthuss, CEO, gestigon GmbH – a Valeo brand, GERMANY
Autonomous vehicles will require an understanding of the state of the driver with regard to awareness, positioning and behaviour to be able to provide controlled handovers. Plus, the knowledge will enhance next-generation driving assistance functionalities before the level 4 SDV are available. First solutions focus on eye tracking and facial expressions, but this is only part of the game. Position and orientation of the head, body, arms, hands and legs need to be tracked. Gestigon is a market leader in this field and will elaborate on the needs and challenges of 3D vision-based tracking software.

1.30pm - 2.30pm - Lunch

2.30pm - 5.30pm - Future layout and design concepts for AV interiors

Moderator
Dr Cyriel Diels, senior lecturer Human Factors, Coventry University, UK

2.30pm - Beyond screens – visions for the autonomous vehicle interior experience
Joseph Simpson, research lead, Car Design Research Ltd, UK
Most visions of autonomous vehicles paint a future of passengers working, or simply doing what they do in many other transition spaces today (staring at a phone screen). We propose that for the current OEMs to stay relevant and survive in an autonomous vehicle future, there needs to be a radical shift in their attitudes, where they focus on differentiating their brands through the unique experience they provide for those on board.

3pm - Anxiety mitigation in AVs
Timothy Smith, design principal, Ustwo Auto, UK
What we have found in our research projects is that there is a greater human need that must be served in the interior design of autonomous vehicles. Anxiety mitigation, particularly (but not exclusively) for people with a disability and for children, who we believe could be the earliest adopters of the technology, is a factor to be addressed. The speaker will discuss Ustwo's research findings and potential design solutions.

3.30pm - Autonomous car interiors at the human scale
Sergio Pininfarina, designer, Campana Pininfarina, ITALY
Ludovico Campana, automotive and mobility designer and co-founder, Campana Pininfarina, ITALY
Today designers don’t just design a vehicle interior – the design must be based on the driver/consumer’s understanding and expectations. Consumer attitudes are quite well understood and somewhat predictable. But the car may be used in different ways and for different types of journey, so we must think carefully about the right experience at the right time, in the right place, with the right activity. The user experience will be determined by the length and type of journey and the desired activity of the user. The interior needs to allow the system to modify it, totally based on the needs and desires of the user on that journey and at that time. The next generation of vehicle interiors, including autonomous vehicle interiors, will welcome productivity and automation and will bring more functions to the vehicle. Advanced HMI will enhance trust and simplicity, which will have a fundamental role in the development of future interiors, so that the whole system will respond just-in-time. This approach to design will necessarily encompass 'inclusive mobility' – a system designed for all.

4pm - 4.30pm - Break

4.30pm - From driver to passenger: the importance of display positioning in carsickness
Ouren Kuiper, researcher, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS
Carsickness is currently a minor disadvantageous issue for the automotive industry. However, in autonomous vehicles, drivers become passengers, who have a far higher risk of becoming carsick than drivers. This risk is again exacerbated when using an in-vehicle display, which increases the sensory conflict between perceived motion and vision, which is in turn the root cause of motion sickness. This study evaluates the impact of the positioning of in-vehicle displays, and subsequent available peripheral vision, on motion sickness in subjects exposed to nauseogenic car motions.

5pm - Translating the learnings from the interior design of driverless pods to different types of autonomous vehicles.
Joscha Wasser, researcher, Horiba MIRA, UK
Many of the headlines about autonomous vehicles focus on the current mass market for private vehicles and the design considerations for them and their interiors. It isn’t surprising either therefore that most of the interior concepts are created for passenger cars. It is likely however that the first experience of autonomous vehicles for most will be in the form of pods. This presentation will focus on what OEMs can learn about the challenges of autonomy for the interior design from the research of interior design for driverless pods.

*This Program may be subject to change.

Day 1

Tuesday 20 June

8.15am - 8.55am - Networking Breakfast

8.15am - Join us on the opening morning for our complimentary networking breakfast! All speakers, delegates, and sponsors are invited to attend

9am - 12.45pm - Opening Keynote Session

Moderator
Prof Frank Flemisch, branch head, Fraunhofer FKIE / RWTH Aachen, GERMANY

9am - Advancements in human factors for highly automated cars
Frederik Diederichs, Engineering Systeme / Human Factors Engineering & Vehicle Interaction, Fraunhofer IAO, GERMANY
The highest uncertainty for highly automated cars evolved from the human factors. How can automated cars be supervised and controlled by human beings? By now the uncertainty has settled down and left 'no go' as well as pragmatic 'does work' solutions. These will be presented as well as new trends for the automated driving experience.

9.30am - A human-centered design framework for future vehicles
Dr Cyriel Diels, senior lecturer Human Factors, Coventry University, UK
With the advance of shared and automated mobility, the driver will no longer be at the heart of the design process. Instead, all efforts will be directed toward the passenger experience which, in future, will become the key user requirement and commercial differentiator. However, designing the passenger experience for shared and automated vehicles is anything but trivial due to the new psychological and physical challenges it introduces. A human-centered design framework is provided to assist the development of safe, usable, comfortable and desirable future mobility solutions.

10am - Reviewing the state of semi-autonomous HMI
Derek Viita, Senior Analyst- User Experience Practice, Strategy Analytics, USA
Good UX and cockpit design in an autonomous driving ecosystem hinges on proper communication of system status, smooth handover and takeover procedures, and the natural feeling of driving maneuvers. Strategy Analytics regularly conducts evaluations of a variety of autonomous and semi-autonomous features, including park assist, traffic jam assist and autonomous highway driving. In this session, we review current semi-autonomous offerings, and potential effects on future rollout of fully autonomous driving systems.

10.30am - 11.15am - Break

11.15am - Intention – a tool to increase trust in automated vehicles
Maria Nilsson, senior researcher, Rise Viktoria, SWEDEN
With the increased level of automation, concerns have been raised regarding drivers becoming out of the control loop, causing reduced satisfaction and reduced perceived control. Our research has explored the role of 'intention communication' as an innovative way to leverage mutual understanding between human and automation. By using Wizard-of-Oz techniques, independent research has been made possible that shows the role of intention communication for perceived control and safety. Studies are presented that exemplify different approaches for intention communication using internal and external interfaces.

11.45am - How infotainment will influence autonomous cars’ cockpits and interiors
Hans Roth, director technology marketing, Harman Becker Automotive Systems GmbH, GERMANY
Passengers in autonomous vehicles will enjoy a whole new range of freedoms. They will be able to read, work, watch movies and – in the long term – even sleep. This will not only have a lasting impact on the character of travelling by car; it also calls for completely new interior and seating architectures, as well as operating and display concepts. Infotainment technology world leader Harman teamed up with Swiss automotive think-tank Rinspeed to develop the XchangE touring sedan and the ‘trans-urban SUV’ Budii, two autonomous driving concept cars that show what 21st-century mobility will look like.

12.15pm - How aircraft cabin design can influence configuration of autonomous vehicles
John Tighe, design director transport, JPA Design, UK
We will explore how innovation in the design and configuration of airline seats and cabins that perform many functions can help benefit and influence the design of interiors for the autonomous vehicle. JPA Designs for the world's leading airlines, developing spaces and seats that are multi-functional yet comfortable and intuitive for passengers. A space to relax, watch a movie, work, dine, sleep and socialise. How could this up-in-the-air experience influence the on-the-ground autonomous vehicle? What are the possibilities and what would this look like?

12.45pm - 2.15pm - Lunch

2.15pm - 6pm - HMI and UX considerations for AV interiors

Moderator
Frederik Diederichs, Engineering Systeme / Human Factors Engineering & Vehicle Interaction, Fraunhofer IAO, GERMANY

2.15pm - AdaptIVe – human factors aspects of automated driving
Stefan Wolter, HMI specialist, Ford Werke GmbH, GERMANY
A presentation of selected results from the AdaptIVe large-scale European project on vehicle automation, focusing on aspects of the human-vehicle integration subproject.

2.45pm - Designing interiors and human-machine interfaces for resilience of automated vehicle systems
Prof Frank Flemisch, branch head, Fraunhofer FKIE / RWTH Aachen, GERMANY
Yigiterkut Canpolat, research associate, Human Systems Integration RWTH Aachen University, GERMANY
Vehicle automation is one way of using autonomous capabilities together with humans. Partially automated systems are already in serial production, and highly and fully automated vehicles are under research and development. Resilience is the key ability to safely respond to non-normal events. This paper gives an introduction to the DFG System Ergonomics project, which deals with resilient design and test of automated vehicle systems in normal operations, at system limits and at failures. Some theory and the state of the research will be sketched, and examples given of how to practically apply this to design and testing for interior and human-machine interfaces of automated vehicles.

3.15pm - To drive or to be driven: human-centred vehicles of tomorrow
Dr Meike Jipp, head of Human Factors Department, Institute of Transportation Systems, German Aerospace Centre (DLR), GERMANY
In the near future, automated systems will ease the driving task and drive autonomously at least partially. Such systems have the potential to revolutionise mobility. Therefore, these systems have to be enabled to cope with individual user requirements and to interact adequately with drivers of less equipped vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians. The systems are thus part of a complex socio-technical system, which has to be optimised as a whole. This optimisation includes the adequate consideration of challenges from a human-factors perspective. These challenges, and solutions to these challenges, will be discussed within the scope of this presentation.

3.45pm - 4.30pm - Break

4.30pm - Highly automated driving – key components for driver-vehicle interaction
Dr Thomas Vöhringer-Kuhnt, head of Comptence Center HMI, Continental Automotive GmbH, GERMANY
Bettina Leuchtenberg, expert for usability & ergonomics, Continental Automotive GmbH, GERMANY
Dr Heinz Abel, head of Center of Competence, Continental Automotive GmbH, GERMANY
This presentation will discuss Continental Automotive' approach to HMI solutions for passenger vehicles, with a focus on automated driving.

5pm - Grow confidence from your driving simulator results
Philip van der Borch, application engineer, Moog, NETHERLANDS
Human behavior plays a key role in designing and validating new UX concepts. A robust and valid test environment is required to execute such tests. For many years, driving simulators have been used to provide a reproducible test environment. These driving simulators vary from simple desktop setups up to highly complex large hydraulic systems. What should a driving simulator consist of to obtain valid results? By means of real-life examples, this presentation illustrates what effect a driving simulator concept has on human behavior.

5.30pm - From assisted to autonomous driving: an HMI perspective
Olaf Preissner, head of UX automotive, Luxoft, GERMANY
Understand the HMI as the center of consumer experience of non-autonomous and autonomous driving. What is the effect on user experience during automated driving? Autonomous driving from an end-user/usability perspective. The presentation will discuss the paradigm shift in the driver-vehicle relationship with advanced automation – changing the driver’s role from 'driving' to 'supervising'. Understand the specific HMI development challenges of autonomous driving and the requirements for a future HMI.

*This Program may be subject to change.

Day 2

Wednesday 21 June

9am - 1.30pm - AV Interiors that enhance mode awareness and transition

Moderator
Derek Viita, Senior Analyst- User Experience Practice, Strategy Analytics, USA

9am - Are consumers ready and waiting for automated vehicles?
Fabian Chowanetz, senior consultant, automotive solutions, J.D. Power and Associates GmbH, GERMANY
Understanding users’ interaction satisfaction with ADAS technology in their vehicles today will play a critical role for future consumer interest in increasing levels of automation. Customers’ problems with technology define a framework for the development of tomorrow’s vehicle interior concepts. Within this session, Fabian will explore J.D. Power’s latest consumer research surrounding automotive usability regarding first-time ease of use and learning of new technologies. He will also reveal future and emerging technologies that consumers are seeking in their next vehicles and address the importance of trust in technology.

9.30am - Facilitating safe, user-paced control transitions in automated vehicles
Alexander Eriksson, Marie Curie ITN Fellow, University of Southampton, UK
The development of automated vehicles is quickly advancing in industry, and several challenges have to be tackled as part of this progression. There is a plethora of research addressing urgent transitions of vehicle control, but no one is talking of the more mundane, regular non-critical transition. Our research has found great variability in the time drivers take to resume control in non-critical situations, ranging from 2-25 seconds. The question is, what are the consequences of this, and how can we design and facilitate the transition process in non-critical transitions of control?

10am - Mode awareness issues in partially and highly automated driving
Dr Christian Purucker, project manager, WIVW GmbH, GERMANY
Recent events have raised public attention regarding mode awareness issues in partially and highly automated vehicles. Although there is a tradition of human factors research on mode awareness issues in the field of aviation, this research has only just begun within the field of vehicle automation. However, research from recent years has already accumulated considerable knowledge in this domain, and will continue to do so. The talk will discuss examples of mode awareness issues in this domain and review relevant works.

10.30am - Supporting non-driving-related activities in the autonomous car
Bastian Pfleging, researcher, Ludwig Maximilian Universität - Human-Machine Interaction Group, GERMANY
Today, many car drivers face the challenge of maneuvering a car and simultaneously operating in-car computer systems. The driver adjusts the climate control unit, selects a music title, enters navigation destinations, etc. However, such interaction distracts the driver from his primary task of driving the car. This presentation will present examples of research on novel user interfaces that support safe driving and a good user/driving experience in the transition between manual and automated driving.

11am - 11.30am - Break

11.30am - Driver monitoring as a building block for autonomous driving
Christian Mueller, senior manager innovation field advanced driver assistance, Leopold Kostal GmbH & Co KG, GERMANY
To meet the requirements for an autonomous or semi-automated ride, it is necessary to detect the driver's attention level. In AD-Level 2, driver observation can contribute to a significant comfort gain. Also a lower demand of the driver's attention (fatigue and micro sleep) must be detected, for example, by an analysis of the eyelids. In addition to the assistance and safety area, the driver monitoring camera will play an important role in the future vehicle HMI. The various levels of algorithms and also the necessary hardware technologies will be covered in this presentation.

12pm - How autonomous vehicle interiors can be designed to make users aware of urgent situations when operating in autonomous mode.
Johann Visser, senior consultant (traffic systems), Rijkswaterstaat, NETHERLANDS
How autonomous vehicle interiors can be designed to make users aware of urgent situations when operating in autonomous mode. Autonomous vehicles are going to support and eventually replace drivers as a factor within the traffic system. The traditional interface between road agencies (authorities, operators) and drivers is shifting toward vehicle interiors. This especially holds true for autonomous driving levels 3 and 4, even more so with mixed traffic. We will explore how urgent road agency directions may effectively be transmitted to drivers during hands-and-eyes-off mode, under what conditions vehicle interior changes will facilitate road-side divestments, and in which areas regulation and standardization are needed.

12.30pm - Camera-based smart and attentive interiors: recognising passengers and situations
Dr Michael Voit, research group manager, Fraunhofer IOSB, GERMANY
Recognising passengers and the interior activity situation can be crucial in determining whether the driver is distracted or able to take over control of a (semi-)autonomous car. Herein, not only is the driver's state key, but also the presence of further passengers within the car and with whom and how they are interacting. Furthermore, getting to know the driver and passengers provides many possibilities for personalised safety and even comfort functions, in order to increase the overall user experience and heighten the fun in driving.

1pm - Passenger behaviour tracking as a prerequisite for autonomous vehicles
Moritz von Grotthuss, CEO, gestigon GmbH – a Valeo brand, GERMANY
Autonomous vehicles will require an understanding of the state of the driver with regard to awareness, positioning and behaviour to be able to provide controlled handovers. Plus, the knowledge will enhance next-generation driving assistance functionalities before the level 4 SDV are available. First solutions focus on eye tracking and facial expressions, but this is only part of the game. Position and orientation of the head, body, arms, hands and legs need to be tracked. Gestigon is a market leader in this field and will elaborate on the needs and challenges of 3D vision-based tracking software.

1.30pm - 2.30pm - Lunch

2.30pm - 5.30pm - Future layout and design concepts for AV interiors

Moderator
Dr Cyriel Diels, senior lecturer Human Factors, Coventry University, UK

2.30pm - Beyond screens – visions for the autonomous vehicle interior experience
Joseph Simpson, research lead, Car Design Research Ltd, UK
Most visions of autonomous vehicles paint a future of passengers working, or simply doing what they do in many other transition spaces today (staring at a phone screen). We propose that for the current OEMs to stay relevant and survive in an autonomous vehicle future, there needs to be a radical shift in their attitudes, where they focus on differentiating their brands through the unique experience they provide for those on board.

3pm - Anxiety mitigation in AVs
Timothy Smith, design principal, Ustwo Auto, UK
What we have found in our research projects is that there is a greater human need that must be served in the interior design of autonomous vehicles. Anxiety mitigation, particularly (but not exclusively) for people with a disability and for children, who we believe could be the earliest adopters of the technology, is a factor to be addressed. The speaker will discuss Ustwo's research findings and potential design solutions.

3.30pm - Autonomous car interiors at the human scale
Sergio Pininfarina, designer, Campana Pininfarina, ITALY
Ludovico Campana, automotive and mobility designer and co-founder, Campana Pininfarina, ITALY
Today designers don’t just design a vehicle interior – the design must be based on the driver/consumer’s understanding and expectations. Consumer attitudes are quite well understood and somewhat predictable. But the car may be used in different ways and for different types of journey, so we must think carefully about the right experience at the right time, in the right place, with the right activity. The user experience will be determined by the length and type of journey and the desired activity of the user. The interior needs to allow the system to modify it, totally based on the needs and desires of the user on that journey and at that time. The next generation of vehicle interiors, including autonomous vehicle interiors, will welcome productivity and automation and will bring more functions to the vehicle. Advanced HMI will enhance trust and simplicity, which will have a fundamental role in the development of future interiors, so that the whole system will respond just-in-time. This approach to design will necessarily encompass 'inclusive mobility' – a system designed for all.

4pm - 4.30pm - Break

4.30pm - From driver to passenger: the importance of display positioning in carsickness
Ouren Kuiper, researcher, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS
Carsickness is currently a minor disadvantageous issue for the automotive industry. However, in autonomous vehicles, drivers become passengers, who have a far higher risk of becoming carsick than drivers. This risk is again exacerbated when using an in-vehicle display, which increases the sensory conflict between perceived motion and vision, which is in turn the root cause of motion sickness. This study evaluates the impact of the positioning of in-vehicle displays, and subsequent available peripheral vision, on motion sickness in subjects exposed to nauseogenic car motions.

5pm - Translating the learnings from the interior design of driverless pods to different types of autonomous vehicles.
Joscha Wasser, researcher, Horiba MIRA, UK
Many of the headlines about autonomous vehicles focus on the current mass market for private vehicles and the design considerations for them and their interiors. It isn’t surprising either therefore that most of the interior concepts are created for passenger cars. It is likely however that the first experience of autonomous vehicles for most will be in the form of pods. This presentation will focus on what OEMs can learn about the challenges of autonomy for the interior design from the research of interior design for driverless pods.

*This Program may be subject to change.

 
 
Preliminary Program
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Topics under discussion:
  • Next generation interior design
  • Flexible and moveable seating
  • New seating configurations and possibilities
  • Wraparound LED screens and virtual environments
  • Apps and in-car connectivity
  • Integrated tablets and dashboard possibilities
  • Fold-away steering concepts
  • Gesture recognition
  • Infotainment
  • Human-machine interfacing
  • New materials
  • Occupant safety and airbag placement
  • Voice recognition technology