Autonomous Vehicle Interior Design & Technology Symposium, Novi, Michigan 2017
 
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2017 Conference Program

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Day 1

Wednesday 25 October

9am - 1pm - Keynote Presentations: Visions for the drivenger experience

Moderator
Tom Pavlak, founder, Autonomous Vehicle Alliance, USA

9am - How humans will behave when riding shotgun to autonomous vehicles
Chris Rockwell, CEO and founder, Lextant, USA
How does human behavior change when vehicles are able to drive themselves? What does the car interior of the future look like to enable these behaviors and the desires of occupants? This presentation will explore behavioral adaptation and the changing landscape of vehicle interiors for future mobility – from personalization and connection to productivity and discovery – and the implications for transportation design.

9.30am - Differentiating automotive interior systems with artificial intelligence and computer vision
Chris Keil, COO, Caruma Technologies, USA
This presentation will highlight several disruptive new technologies and underscore why automotive OEMs and suppliers must either get on board with them or be disrupted. They include artificial intelligence, computer vision, big data analytics and cloud technology. Additional highlights include how to integrate some of the core technology being developed for autonomous vehicles and connected cars in order to be the first to offer differentiated products in a highly competitive industry. It will also feature examples from a global manufacturer in the automotive industry.

10am - Simplicity and reduction: the designer's guide to AV interiors
Jason B Johnson, director of user experience design - connected car, Harman International, USA
Traditional product development processes in automotive have led to a rise in complexity and confusion for consumers. This has made it difficult for consumers to trust connected car technology as the autonomous future approaches. A user-centered, iterative and collaborative design process characterized by continuous learning (analytics) and continuous deployment (over-the-air updates) is required to move forward. A mindset of simplicity and reduction will guide designers and engineers as they build connected car ecosystems of the future.

10.30am - 11am - Break

11am - Romanticizing the Highways: Again !
Jeevak Badve, VP strategic growth, Sundberg-Ferar, USA
The six major thrusts in the current vehicular economy - Autonomy, Connectivity, Digitization, Electrification, Sensorification and Robotics; are all blending in together with the emotional customer expectation model to finally offer us the promise made to us in the 60’s: the dawn of the space age. This might very well be a reality now as the leadership minds of today are harnessing the fundamental wonder of charting and navigating on the human centric design highway; discovering the very crucial and fundamental needs, wants, desires and dreams of humanity over the “price-minus” business mentality. Let’s try to have a peek at what it means to expect and live an everyday ordinary life interacting with these highly “algorithm rich” vehicles full with interfaces or lack there off.

11.30am - Autonomous mobility 2050: four potential transformative outcomes for vehicle interiors
Dat Truong, Manager, Technology and Strategy Consulting, P3 North America Inc, USA
In this presentation, Dat Truong will explore the extremes between different approaches in the industry using four examples considering potential future market dominance by each of the following: automotive OEMs, shared mobility, tech giants and disruptive startups. The conclusion he draws is that different markets will see different market shares of these four examples, depending on the demographic mix of each area (age, income, gender, etc). These conclusions will have a profound impact on the user interaction with the vehicle interior and configurations of each extreme.

12pm - 1pm - Panel Discussion:What is the future of AV Interiors?

Chris Keil, COO, Caruma Technologies, USA
Chris Rockwell, CEO and founder, Lextant, USA
Dat Truong, Manager, Technology and Strategy Consulting, P3 North America Inc, USA
Jason B Johnson, director of user experience design - connected car, Harman International, USA
Jeevak Badve, VP strategic growth, Sundberg-Ferar, USA


Moderator:
Tom Pavlak, founder, Autonomous Vehicle Alliance

1pm - 2pm - Lunch

2pm - 6pm - Building confidence for AV users

Moderator
Brian Rhodes, automotive technology analyst, IHS Markit, USA

2pm - Building rider confidence through vehicle cognition and augmented reality technology
Sravan Puttagunta, CEO and co-founder, Civil Maps, USA
This session looks at the key challenge of earning rider trust in autonomous transportation and how technology can address these issues. While developers work to build self-driving cars, the need for designing this experience in a rider-centric model is essential. At every point in the trip, passengers will need continuous confirmation about the car’s intentions and what it perceives in its surroundings. The natural desire for control also means that passengers will require interaction tools to ensure safety and reduce fear, especially in the early stages of introducing these vehicles to the public.

2.30pm - The public understanding of driverless technology and obtaining design requirements for SAE 3 takeover
Dr Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK
There is surprisingly little understanding of the public’s expectations of autonomous vehicle driving. In particular, people are not clear what to expect, for example, in taking control of the car during a period of autonomous driving and have had little opportunity to experience this. This paper describes the findings from participants after they had experiences SAE level 3 takeover tasks in a simulator, and discusses them in relation to the latest literature and other qualitative data from the project. There is a burgeoning and long standing literature on Self Driving Cars (SDC) and their effect on society. A good deal of this literature has been carried out within the domain of the research lab, or specialists in socio economics, transport researchers, or Business information reporting. Much of it discussed current perspective for automation in near future timeframe (10-15 years). Older survey studies have reported predictions regarding the prevalence of specific technologies that were found to be highly conservative. Recent studies, including from those reported here, suggest that sampled public perception is divided, rapidly changing, and highly dependent on context and potential biases in reporting. Hence, older survey and laboratory studies are likely to be less informative about current public opinion due to the effect of varying public exposure to publicity.

3pm - Consumer trust in autonomous vehicles
Tom Pavlak, founder, Autonomous Vehicle Alliance, USA
The Autonomous Vehicle Alliance is a group of leading autonomous companies. The board is made up of Ford Motor Company, General Motors, FCA, All State Insurance and Cox Automotive. Its membership also includes retailers, Tier 1s and specialty manufacturers. The alliance focuses on issues around the consumer. In this presentation, Tom Pavlak will discuss the research they have conducted into consumer trust issues.

3.30pm - 4pm - Break

4pm - Consumer blind spot
Kristin Kolodge, executive director, driver interaction and HMI, J.D. Power, USA
Understanding users’ interaction satisfaction with ADAS technology in their vehicles today will play a critical role for consumer interest in increasing levels of automation for the future and what that will mean for the vehicle’s interior. Within this session, Kristin will explore J.D. Power’s latest consumer research surrounding automotive usability trends and how that impacts emerging technologies that consumers are seeking in their next vehicles.

4.30pm - Keeping the driver informed: How HMIs affect acceptance and trust of vehicle automation
Dr Bobbie D Seppelt, research scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab & New England University Transportation Center, USA
The Advanced Vehicle Technology (AVT) Consortium was launched in September 2015 with the goal of achieving a data-driven understanding of how drivers leverage vehicle automation, driver assistance technologies, and the range of in-vehicle and portable technologies for connectivity and infotainment. Using advanced computer-vision software and big data analytics, researchers are gathering data to quantify drivers’ actions, such as how they respond to various driving situations and perform other actions like eating or having conversations behind the wheel. The research is studying the moments when control transfers from the driver to the car and back again, as well as how drivers respond to alarms (lane keeping, forward collision, proximity detectors, etc.) and leverage technologies (e.g., semi-autonomous parking assistance, assisted cruise control, vehicle infotainment and communications systems, smartphones and more). The effort aims to develop a human-centric insights that drive the safety efficacy of automated vehicle technology development and advances the consumer’s understanding of appropriate technology usage.

5pm - 6pm - Panel Discussion: Designing passenger trust into AVs

Dr Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK
Sravan Puttagunta, CEO and co-founder, Civil Maps, USA
Dr Bobbie D Seppelt, research scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab & New England University Transportation Center, USA
Tom Pavlak, founder, Autonomous Vehicle Alliance, USA
Kristin Kolodge, executive director, driver interaction and HMI, J.D. Power, USA


Moderator:
Brian Rhodes, automotive technology analyst, IHS Markit
Brian Rhodes, automotive technology analyst, IHS Markit

Day 2

Thursday 26 October

9am - 11am - Driver monitoring to enhance safe mode transition

Moderator
Chris Schreiner, director of syndicated research, Strategy Analytics Inc, USA

9am - Safe and intuitive transition from autonomous to manual driving modes
Joe Klesing, executive director, Nexteer Automotive, USA
Human-machine interfaces enable multi-modal communication between driver and vehicle and allow control authority to be transferred quickly and safely in conditional or high automated driving modes. Before drivers fully assume manual control, they need sufficient situational awareness of the road and traffic situation and operational control of the vehicle so that they can safely manage the ongoing driving and traffic situation. Safe monitoring provides a highly accurate and reliable measure of the driver’s ability and willingness to assume manual control of a vehicle by combining information from multiple sensor systems, including camera-based driver monitoring, hands-on detection and steering-related information.

9.30am - Sensing and illumination trends for self-driving vehicle interiors
Rajeev Thakur, regional marketing manager, Osram Opto Semiconductors, USA
Autonomous vehicles will open up a whole new world of lighting and sensing opportunities for drivers and passengers alike. This presentation will spotlight six of the most important trends and technologies that will change the interiors of autonomous vehicles now and in the future, including: driver monitoring and iris recognition, expanded head-up displays that communicate and entertain, seating sensors to prepare passengers, interior cameras for occupant safety, gesture recognition with infrared technology, and mood lighting for work, rest or play.

10am - Passenger behavior tracking as a prerequisite for NHTSA safety
Moritz von Grotthuss, CEO, Gestigon GmbH - a Valeo brand, GERMANY
The NHTSA requires an understanding of the state of the driver with regard to positioning to be able to provide state-of-the-art safety solutions by 2018. Plus, several regulators require black boxes for self-driving cars to provide up to two years of driver data in case of accidents and misuse (speeding, hit and run, etc.). To fulfill this, not only the eyes, but also the position and orientation of the head, body, arms, hands and legs need to be tracked. Gestigon is market leader and will elaborate on the needs and challenges of 3D tracking software.

10.30am - 11am - Panel Discussion

Moritz von Grotthuss, CEO, Gestigon GmbH - a Valeo brand, GERMANY
Rajeev Thakur, regional marketing manager, Osram Opto Semiconductors, USA
Joe Klesing, executive director, Nexteer Automotive, USA


Moderator:
Chris Schreiner, director of syndicated research, Strategy Analytics Inc

11am - 11.30am - Break

11.30am - 1pm - Interior innovations for automated driving

Moderator
Dr Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK

11.30am - A lean HMI development for great user experience
Olaf Preissner, head of UX automotive and innovation, Luxoft, GERMANY
The presentation will discuss how automated driving impacts the user experience, looking at it from an end-user and usability perspective. It will also examine the specific HMI development challenges of autonomous driving and the requirements for the next-generation HMI, and will discuss bringing infotainment with stunning user experiences to the road – faster, cheaper, smarter.

12pm - Automated driving innovations from Continental Automotive
Zack Bolton, systems specialist, Continental Automotive Systems, USA
This presentation will review the HMI innovations being developed and tested by Continental Automotive Systems which will be applicable to automated vehicles.

12.30pm - 1pm - Panel Discussion

Zack Bolton, systems specialist, Continental Automotive Systems, USA
Olaf Preissner, head of UX automotive and innovation, Luxoft, GERMANY


Moderator:
Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department

1pm - 2pm - Lunch

2pm - 5pm - Design considerations for automated driving

Moderator
Dr Bobbie D Seppelt, research scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab & New England University Transportation Center, USA

2pm - Impact of semi-autonomous features on in-vehicle displays
Chris Schreiner, director of syndicated research, Strategy Analytics Inc, USA
This presentation will review the current UX display-related issues with semi-autonomous features. It will explore how emerging display trends can optimise semi-autonomous UX and give examples of emerging display and HMI trends.

2.30pm - User experience innovations for tomorrow's autonomous cars
Brian Rhodes, automotive technology analyst, IHS Markit, USA
The presentation will discuss mid-term HMI/UX trends developing in a driver-centric world, and how the introduction of a passenger-centric world alters those trends. A high-level autonomous vehicle forecast will lead into a market assessment of various technologies including gesture, AMOLED, curved/flexible displays, and general HMI design trends. A value assessment of these technologies and how this evolution may shift the supply chain will also be discussed.

3pm - HMI design and evaluation issues for automated vehicles and computational engineering solutions
Dr Paul A Green, research professor, University of Michigan Transport Research Institute, USA
This presentation will provide a broad ranging overview of what is known and not known about HMIs for future vehicles, with the exact topic coverage being adjusted to complement other presenters. The presentation will begin with a review of current studies on driver use of HMIs and the problems that drivers experience with early versions of Level 2 and Level 3 HMIs as well as potential solutions. In addition, he will cover issues of proposed test methods for HMIs (NHTSA ideas, California PATH) and most importantly, the underlying models that describe human performance in car following (e.g., GHR) and lane change behavior (Gipps). The major theme of the talk is that many questions about HMI design can be initially addressed by utilizing theories of human behavior and computation models, not by “just testing stuff.” Time permitting, the major research issues that need to be addressed will be identified.

3.45pm - 4pm - Break

4pm - 5pm - Panel Discussion: Inclusive, desirable, safe, intuitive and trusted: Can AV Interiors have it all?

Dr Paul A Green, research professor, University of Michigan Transport Research Institute, USA
Dr Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK
Chris Schreiner, director of syndicated research, Strategy Analytics Inc, USA
Brian Rhodes, analyst - automotive HMI and usability, IHS Markit, USA


Moderator:
Bobbie D Seppelt, research scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab & New England University Transportation Center


Day 1

Wednesday 25 October

9am - 1pm - Keynote Presentations: Visions for the drivenger experience

Moderator
Tom Pavlak, founder, Autonomous Vehicle Alliance, USA

9am - How humans will behave when riding shotgun to autonomous vehicles
Chris Rockwell, CEO and founder, Lextant, USA
How does human behavior change when vehicles are able to drive themselves? What does the car interior of the future look like to enable these behaviors and the desires of occupants? This presentation will explore behavioral adaptation and the changing landscape of vehicle interiors for future mobility – from personalization and connection to productivity and discovery – and the implications for transportation design.

9.30am - Differentiating automotive interior systems with artificial intelligence and computer vision
Chris Keil, COO, Caruma Technologies, USA
This presentation will highlight several disruptive new technologies and underscore why automotive OEMs and suppliers must either get on board with them or be disrupted. They include artificial intelligence, computer vision, big data analytics and cloud technology. Additional highlights include how to integrate some of the core technology being developed for autonomous vehicles and connected cars in order to be the first to offer differentiated products in a highly competitive industry. It will also feature examples from a global manufacturer in the automotive industry.

10am - Simplicity and reduction: the designer's guide to AV interiors
Jason B Johnson, director of user experience design - connected car, Harman International, USA
Traditional product development processes in automotive have led to a rise in complexity and confusion for consumers. This has made it difficult for consumers to trust connected car technology as the autonomous future approaches. A user-centered, iterative and collaborative design process characterized by continuous learning (analytics) and continuous deployment (over-the-air updates) is required to move forward. A mindset of simplicity and reduction will guide designers and engineers as they build connected car ecosystems of the future.

10.30am - 11am - Break

11am - Romanticizing the Highways: Again !
Jeevak Badve, VP strategic growth, Sundberg-Ferar, USA
The six major thrusts in the current vehicular economy - Autonomy, Connectivity, Digitization, Electrification, Sensorification and Robotics; are all blending in together with the emotional customer expectation model to finally offer us the promise made to us in the 60’s: the dawn of the space age. This might very well be a reality now as the leadership minds of today are harnessing the fundamental wonder of charting and navigating on the human centric design highway; discovering the very crucial and fundamental needs, wants, desires and dreams of humanity over the “price-minus” business mentality. Let’s try to have a peek at what it means to expect and live an everyday ordinary life interacting with these highly “algorithm rich” vehicles full with interfaces or lack there off.

11.30am - Autonomous mobility 2050: four potential transformative outcomes for vehicle interiors
Dat Truong, Manager, Technology and Strategy Consulting, P3 North America Inc, USA
In this presentation, Dat Truong will explore the extremes between different approaches in the industry using four examples considering potential future market dominance by each of the following: automotive OEMs, shared mobility, tech giants and disruptive startups. The conclusion he draws is that different markets will see different market shares of these four examples, depending on the demographic mix of each area (age, income, gender, etc). These conclusions will have a profound impact on the user interaction with the vehicle interior and configurations of each extreme.

12pm - 1pm - Panel Discussion:What is the future of AV Interiors?

Chris Keil, COO, Caruma Technologies, USA
Chris Rockwell, CEO and founder, Lextant, USA
Dat Truong, Manager, Technology and Strategy Consulting, P3 North America Inc, USA
Jason B Johnson, director of user experience design - connected car, Harman International, USA
Jeevak Badve, VP strategic growth, Sundberg-Ferar, USA


Moderator:
Tom Pavlak, founder, Autonomous Vehicle Alliance

1pm - 2pm - Lunch

2pm - 6pm - Building confidence for AV users

Moderator
Brian Rhodes, automotive technology analyst, IHS Markit, USA

2pm - Building rider confidence through vehicle cognition and augmented reality technology
Sravan Puttagunta, CEO and co-founder, Civil Maps, USA
This session looks at the key challenge of earning rider trust in autonomous transportation and how technology can address these issues. While developers work to build self-driving cars, the need for designing this experience in a rider-centric model is essential. At every point in the trip, passengers will need continuous confirmation about the car’s intentions and what it perceives in its surroundings. The natural desire for control also means that passengers will require interaction tools to ensure safety and reduce fear, especially in the early stages of introducing these vehicles to the public.

2.30pm - The public understanding of driverless technology and obtaining design requirements for SAE 3 takeover
Dr Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK
There is surprisingly little understanding of the public’s expectations of autonomous vehicle driving. In particular, people are not clear what to expect, for example, in taking control of the car during a period of autonomous driving and have had little opportunity to experience this. This paper describes the findings from participants after they had experiences SAE level 3 takeover tasks in a simulator, and discusses them in relation to the latest literature and other qualitative data from the project. There is a burgeoning and long standing literature on Self Driving Cars (SDC) and their effect on society. A good deal of this literature has been carried out within the domain of the research lab, or specialists in socio economics, transport researchers, or Business information reporting. Much of it discussed current perspective for automation in near future timeframe (10-15 years). Older survey studies have reported predictions regarding the prevalence of specific technologies that were found to be highly conservative. Recent studies, including from those reported here, suggest that sampled public perception is divided, rapidly changing, and highly dependent on context and potential biases in reporting. Hence, older survey and laboratory studies are likely to be less informative about current public opinion due to the effect of varying public exposure to publicity.

3pm - Consumer trust in autonomous vehicles
Tom Pavlak, founder, Autonomous Vehicle Alliance, USA
The Autonomous Vehicle Alliance is a group of leading autonomous companies. The board is made up of Ford Motor Company, General Motors, FCA, All State Insurance and Cox Automotive. Its membership also includes retailers, Tier 1s and specialty manufacturers. The alliance focuses on issues around the consumer. In this presentation, Tom Pavlak will discuss the research they have conducted into consumer trust issues.

3.30pm - 4pm - Break

4pm - Consumer blind spot
Kristin Kolodge, executive director, driver interaction and HMI, J.D. Power, USA
Understanding users’ interaction satisfaction with ADAS technology in their vehicles today will play a critical role for consumer interest in increasing levels of automation for the future and what that will mean for the vehicle’s interior. Within this session, Kristin will explore J.D. Power’s latest consumer research surrounding automotive usability trends and how that impacts emerging technologies that consumers are seeking in their next vehicles.

4.30pm - Keeping the driver informed: How HMIs affect acceptance and trust of vehicle automation
Dr Bobbie D Seppelt, research scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab & New England University Transportation Center, USA
The Advanced Vehicle Technology (AVT) Consortium was launched in September 2015 with the goal of achieving a data-driven understanding of how drivers leverage vehicle automation, driver assistance technologies, and the range of in-vehicle and portable technologies for connectivity and infotainment. Using advanced computer-vision software and big data analytics, researchers are gathering data to quantify drivers’ actions, such as how they respond to various driving situations and perform other actions like eating or having conversations behind the wheel. The research is studying the moments when control transfers from the driver to the car and back again, as well as how drivers respond to alarms (lane keeping, forward collision, proximity detectors, etc.) and leverage technologies (e.g., semi-autonomous parking assistance, assisted cruise control, vehicle infotainment and communications systems, smartphones and more). The effort aims to develop a human-centric insights that drive the safety efficacy of automated vehicle technology development and advances the consumer’s understanding of appropriate technology usage.

5pm - 6pm - Panel Discussion: Designing passenger trust into AVs

Dr Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK
Sravan Puttagunta, CEO and co-founder, Civil Maps, USA
Dr Bobbie D Seppelt, research scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab & New England University Transportation Center, USA
Tom Pavlak, founder, Autonomous Vehicle Alliance, USA
Kristin Kolodge, executive director, driver interaction and HMI, J.D. Power, USA


Moderator:
Brian Rhodes, automotive technology analyst, IHS Markit
Brian Rhodes, automotive technology analyst, IHS Markit


Day 2

Thursday 26 October

9am - 11am - Driver monitoring to enhance safe mode transition

Moderator
Chris Schreiner, director of syndicated research, Strategy Analytics Inc, USA

9am - Safe and intuitive transition from autonomous to manual driving modes
Joe Klesing, executive director, Nexteer Automotive, USA
Human-machine interfaces enable multi-modal communication between driver and vehicle and allow control authority to be transferred quickly and safely in conditional or high automated driving modes. Before drivers fully assume manual control, they need sufficient situational awareness of the road and traffic situation and operational control of the vehicle so that they can safely manage the ongoing driving and traffic situation. Safe monitoring provides a highly accurate and reliable measure of the driver’s ability and willingness to assume manual control of a vehicle by combining information from multiple sensor systems, including camera-based driver monitoring, hands-on detection and steering-related information.

9.30am - Sensing and illumination trends for self-driving vehicle interiors
Rajeev Thakur, regional marketing manager, Osram Opto Semiconductors, USA
Autonomous vehicles will open up a whole new world of lighting and sensing opportunities for drivers and passengers alike. This presentation will spotlight six of the most important trends and technologies that will change the interiors of autonomous vehicles now and in the future, including: driver monitoring and iris recognition, expanded head-up displays that communicate and entertain, seating sensors to prepare passengers, interior cameras for occupant safety, gesture recognition with infrared technology, and mood lighting for work, rest or play.

10am - Passenger behavior tracking as a prerequisite for NHTSA safety
Moritz von Grotthuss, CEO, Gestigon GmbH - a Valeo brand, GERMANY
The NHTSA requires an understanding of the state of the driver with regard to positioning to be able to provide state-of-the-art safety solutions by 2018. Plus, several regulators require black boxes for self-driving cars to provide up to two years of driver data in case of accidents and misuse (speeding, hit and run, etc.). To fulfill this, not only the eyes, but also the position and orientation of the head, body, arms, hands and legs need to be tracked. Gestigon is market leader and will elaborate on the needs and challenges of 3D tracking software.

10.30am - 11am - Panel Discussion

Moritz von Grotthuss, CEO, Gestigon GmbH - a Valeo brand, GERMANY
Rajeev Thakur, regional marketing manager, Osram Opto Semiconductors, USA
Joe Klesing, executive director, Nexteer Automotive, USA


Moderator:
Chris Schreiner, director of syndicated research, Strategy Analytics Inc

11am - 11.30am - Break

11.30am - 1pm - Interior innovations for automated driving

Moderator
Dr Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK

11.30am - A lean HMI development for great user experience
Olaf Preissner, head of UX automotive and innovation, Luxoft, GERMANY
The presentation will discuss how automated driving impacts the user experience, looking at it from an end-user and usability perspective. It will also examine the specific HMI development challenges of autonomous driving and the requirements for the next-generation HMI, and will discuss bringing infotainment with stunning user experiences to the road – faster, cheaper, smarter.

12pm - Automated driving innovations from Continental Automotive
Zack Bolton, systems specialist, Continental Automotive Systems, USA
This presentation will review the HMI innovations being developed and tested by Continental Automotive Systems which will be applicable to automated vehicles.

12.30pm - 1pm - Panel Discussion

Zack Bolton, systems specialist, Continental Automotive Systems, USA
Olaf Preissner, head of UX automotive and innovation, Luxoft, GERMANY


Moderator:
Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department

1pm - 2pm - Lunch

2pm - 5pm - Design considerations for automated driving

Moderator
Dr Bobbie D Seppelt, research scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab & New England University Transportation Center, USA

2pm - Impact of semi-autonomous features on in-vehicle displays
Chris Schreiner, director of syndicated research, Strategy Analytics Inc, USA
This presentation will review the current UX display-related issues with semi-autonomous features. It will explore how emerging display trends can optimise semi-autonomous UX and give examples of emerging display and HMI trends.

2.30pm - User experience innovations for tomorrow's autonomous cars
Brian Rhodes, automotive technology analyst, IHS Markit, USA
The presentation will discuss mid-term HMI/UX trends developing in a driver-centric world, and how the introduction of a passenger-centric world alters those trends. A high-level autonomous vehicle forecast will lead into a market assessment of various technologies including gesture, AMOLED, curved/flexible displays, and general HMI design trends. A value assessment of these technologies and how this evolution may shift the supply chain will also be discussed.

3pm - HMI design and evaluation issues for automated vehicles and computational engineering solutions
Dr Paul A Green, research professor, University of Michigan Transport Research Institute, USA
This presentation will provide a broad ranging overview of what is known and not known about HMIs for future vehicles, with the exact topic coverage being adjusted to complement other presenters. The presentation will begin with a review of current studies on driver use of HMIs and the problems that drivers experience with early versions of Level 2 and Level 3 HMIs as well as potential solutions. In addition, he will cover issues of proposed test methods for HMIs (NHTSA ideas, California PATH) and most importantly, the underlying models that describe human performance in car following (e.g., GHR) and lane change behavior (Gipps). The major theme of the talk is that many questions about HMI design can be initially addressed by utilizing theories of human behavior and computation models, not by “just testing stuff.” Time permitting, the major research issues that need to be addressed will be identified.

3.45pm - 4pm - Break

4pm - 5pm - Panel Discussion: Inclusive, desirable, safe, intuitive and trusted: Can AV Interiors have it all?

Dr Paul A Green, research professor, University of Michigan Transport Research Institute, USA
Dr Pat Langdon, principal research associate - inclusive design, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK
Chris Schreiner, director of syndicated research, Strategy Analytics Inc, USA
Brian Rhodes, analyst - automotive HMI and usability, IHS Markit, USA


Moderator:
Bobbie D Seppelt, research scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab & New England University Transportation Center

 
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Hear what our attendees are saying about the event

It was certainly noteworthy by me, and others I spoke with, to have the focus be on interior design. That has been the piece of the conversation that has not received enough attention but is absolutely critical to the outcome.

Kristin Kolodge, JD Power – USA

My view is that the speakers presented concise, valuable, and insightful data and information. The speakers themselves were good choices as they had lots of experience, thoughts, and concepts to highlight and present. The questions and panel discussions explored things that are at the “heart” of where autonomous is going, what needs to happens to make it reality, and what roadblocks exist.

Rich Hager, Grupo Antolin – USA

It was thoroughly enjoyable and a truly interesting event. I thought the mix of academia, R&D, analysts, and other industry players led to a substantial amount of content being presented and extremely interesting discussions among attendees.

Chris Schreiner, Strategy Analytics – USA

The quality of the speakers was very high. I truly enjoyed the event.

Rashmi Rao, Harman – USA
 
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